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For children who did contract ARI, children consuming milk fortified with DHA, Beta-Glucan,
PDX and GOS
recovered faster.

19% shorter duration of ARI

Overall, these results reduced the children’s need for antibiotic by 64%1

Lesser Antibiotic usage

Fewer Missed Learning Days

In fact, milk formula with this scientific blend of nutrients have even been shown to reduce missed learning days by a staggering 38%1. These benefits translate into more learning opportunities for your child

 

Yeast Beta-Glucan

Immune-Enhancing ingredient for Your Child

Beta-glucans are a family of polysaccharides, of which substances made up of many individual sugar molecules linked together. It is naturally found in the cell walls of baker’s yeast, certain fungi, cereal grains such as oats and barley, mushrooms and even some algae.

Different foods include different types of Beta-glucan. The type of Beta-glucan better known for its ability to enhance the immune system is the beta-glucan derived from yeast1-3. This type of beta-glucan has been present for thousands of years in the diet of humans, including children, as part of leavened bread products. Because of its ability to help enhance immune defences, Yeast Beta-glucan may complement other nutrients to promote immune health.

As an immune-enhancing ingredient, Beta-Glucan along with other nutrients, helps promote better immunity allowing your child for better learning opportunities.

You can find more information about Beta-Glucan at www.wellmune.com

Beta-Glucan refers to Yeast Beta-glucan


References:

1. Talbott SM, Talbott JA. Effect of beta 1, 3/1, 6 glucan on upper respiratory tract infection symptoms and mood state in marathon athletes. J Sports Sci Med 2009;8:509-15.

2. Talbott SM, Talbott JA. Baker's yeast beta-glucan supplement reduces upper respiratory symptoms and improves mood state in stressed women. J Am Coll Nutr 2012;3:295-300.

3. Fuller R, Butt H, Noakes PS, Kenyon J, Yam TS, Calder PC. Influence of yeast-derived 1,3/1,6 glucopolysaccharide on circulating cytokines and chemokines with respect to upper respiratory tract infections. Nutrition 2012;28:665-9.

Learning Through Stimulation and Play

Stimulation and play help your child learn, through interaction with toys and people such as parents, siblings, and friends. This helps the brain make and strengthen the synapses1. The more interesting and interactive the experiences, the greater the number of neurological connections your baby can make, leading to cognitive, motor, emotional, and communication skills development.

Parents who understand and support play that is appropriate for each age will nurture child development for continuous learning.


Age-appropriate play

1 year: Babies learn to play through their own actions, their interaction with people and objects around them. Parents can help babies learn by talking, dancing and laughing with them and helping them explore the world around them. Suggested activities include playing peek-a-boo, singing nursery rhymes and reading picture books.

2 year: Children start to recognize the names of familiar people, objects, pictures, and body parts. Support your child’s imagination by providing toys that resemble real items such as cars and kitchen equipment. Toys such as building blocks and shape sorters will also encourage your child’s creativity.

3 year: Children have more physical development and motor skills. Children have a better understanding of the environment, and their imagination is wider and more complicated. In pretend play, children can perform social roles like mommy, daddy, teacher or doctor. This will help them understand the conditions, roles and importance of other people, so children can learn to share, exchange, and interact with others for optimal social experience. Encourage motor skill development through activities such as drawing and painting.

Actively stimulating your child with every day helps strengthen brain connections. A simple key to achieve and accelerate Learning


References:

1. Schiller P. Early brain development research review and update. Exchange 2010:26-30.

5 Facts about PDX Every Mom Should Know

What is PDX?

PDX stands for Polydextrose, a dietary fiber that feeds beneficial bacteria throughout the large intestine. It supports the balance of the gut system by stimulating growth and activity of beneficial bacteria (gut flora)1, which benefits your child's natural body defences2.

PDX promotes the digestive health

PDX is a more complex-chain dietary fiber that is fermented relatively slowly and to a lesser extent. With the slow rate of fermentation, the effect is throughout the large intestine rather than only the proximal part.

PDX and GOS: Dietary fiber and prebiotic to support digestive health and immunity

PDX and GOS work in tandem throughout the large intestine to foster the growth of good bacteria and promote digestive health1. The unique blend of PDX and GOS promotes frequent and softer stools in children, thus may help to reduce the risk of occasional constipation3.

Where can PDX be obtained?

PDX can be found as an ingredient in foods and beverages such as baked goods, nutrition bars, and yoghurt.


PDX refers to Polydextrose

GOS refers to galacto-oligosaccharides

References:

1. Scalabrin DM, Mitmesser SH, Welling GW, Harris CL, Marunycz JD, Walker DC, Bos NA, Tölkkö S, Salminen S, Vanderhoof JA. New prebiotic blend of polydextrose and galacto-oligosaccharides has a bifidogenic effect in young infants. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54:343-52.

2. Ouwehand A, Isolauri E, Salminen S. The role of the intestinal microflora for the development of the immune system in early childhood. Eur J Nutr 2002;41 Suppl 1:I32-7.

3. Ribeiro TC, Costa-Ribeiro H Jr, Almeida PS, Pontes MV, Leite ME, Filadelfo LR, Khoury JC, Bean JA, Mitmesser SH, Vanderhoof JA, Scalabrin DM. Stool pattern changes in toddlers consuming a follow-on formula supplemented with polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54:288-90.

Well-Rounded Development for your child’s continuous learning

Do you know that around 1,000 trillion synapses are built through childhood experiences during the early of life? During the early years, synapse density grows to almost twice that of the adult brain1-2.

The more a child learns, the more the brain develops, and vice versa — the more their brain develops, the more they learn. As the child grows, synapses or brain cells connections that are used will be kept, and unused connections will be replaced or removed1.

Since proper brain development is critical for your young child, it is important to help provide your child with the nutrition and stimulation required.

DHA is one of nutrients that are building blocks of the brain. It helps build the brain and keep brain cells flexible. DHA and other nutrients such as Choline, Iron, Zinc, Iodine and Vitamin B help support your child in key development3-6 areas such as cognitive, motor, emotional, and communication skills7.

When a child starts learning, one discovery leads to another. Proper nutrition and parental stimulation give a child exceptional learning.


References:

1. Brotherson S. Understanding brain development in young children. North Dakota: North Dakota State University Extension Service, 2009. [FS-609 Bright Beginnings #4]

2. Schiller P. Early brain development research review and update. Exchange 2010:26-30.

3. Kuratko CN, Barrett EC, Nelson EB, Salem N Jr. The relationship of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with learning and behavior in healthy children: a review. Nutrients 2013;5:2777-810.

4. Prado E, Dewey K. Nutrition and brain development in early life. Washington, DC: Alive & Thrive, 2012. [A&T Technical Brief issue 4]

5. Benton D. The influence of dietary status on the cognitive performance of children. Mol Nutr Food Res 2010;54:457-470.

6. Georgieff MK. Nutrition and the developing brain: nutrient priorities and measurement. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85:614S-620S.

7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services. Developmental Milestones. Version current 21 January 2016. Internet: http://www.cdc.gov/milestones (accessed 7 April 2016).

The Unique Blend to help prepare your child for learning

It is necessary that your child receives the essential nutrients especially during the early years for brain development and learning.

The unique blend of nutrients includes Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), polydextrose (PDX), galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), and Yeast Beta-Glucan. Let's find the answer to how these nutrients work together.

DHA: A key to brain growth and development

Did you know that DHA represents 15% of all fatty acids in the frontal cortex? DHA is a vital fatty acid in the brain and it is a primary structural component of brain tissue, which plays a role in effective communication between brain cells. DHA is essential for brain growth and development, as well as brain function1, including key development areas such as intellectual, motor, emotional/social, and communication skills.

Yeast Beta-Glucan: An ingredient to enhance body’s immune system

The unique blend of ingredients (DHA, PDX, GOS, and Yeast Beta-Glucan) is, specially designed to support more well days4, which means more learning opportunities for his well-rounded development.

PDX and GOS: Dietary fiber and Prebiotic to support digestive health

PDX and GOS work in tandem throughout the large intestine to foster the growth of good bacteria and promote digestive health2,3.


References:

1. Kuratko CN, Barrett EC, Nelson EB, Salem N Jr. The relationship of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with learning and behavior in healthy children: a review. Nutrients 2013;5:2777-810.

2. Scalabrin DM, Mitmesser SH, Welling GW, Harris CL, Marunycz JD, Walker DC, Bos NA, Tölkkö S, Salminen S, Vanderhoof JA. New prebiotic blend of polydextrose and galacto-oligosaccharides has a bifidogenic effect in young infants. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54:343-52.

3. Ribeiro TC, Costa-Ribeiro H Jr, Almeida PS, Pontes MV, Leite ME, Filadelfo LR, Khoury JC, Bean JA, Mitmesser SH, Vanderhoof JA, Scalabrin DM. Stool pattern changes in toddlers consuming a follow-on formula supplemented with polydextrose and galactooligosaccharides. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54:288-90.

4. Li F, Jin X, Liu B, Zhuang W, Scalabrin D. Follow-up formula consumption in 3- to 4-year-olds and respiratory infections: an RCT. Pediatrics 2014;133:e1533-40.